September 1, 2009

The Five Springs Mountain Park (Wuquan shan gonyuan) is a pretty area of mountain scenery, artificial temples and winding paths.
The park is named after the five springs that can be found at the foot of the mountain, to the south of the city. Legend has it that a General from the Western Han Dynasty (206 BC-24 AD), Huo Qubing, stabbed his sword into the ground after finding no water for his horses or himself. The five springs erupted from here and are still flowing today.

 

 

 
The Park has an area of 10,500 square meters and houses more than 10 groups of ancient architecture, mostly of Qing Dynasty (1368-1644 AD) origin. Of these, the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644 AD) Jingang Palace (Jingan gong) and Temple of Reverent Solemnity (Chongqing si) are the best. The first contains a magnificent 16ft bronze Buddha cast in 1370 AD, while the latter houses an ancient bronze bell, 10 feet high and weighing 5 tons, that dates back to 1202 AD.

September 1, 2009

 

 

The Confucian Temple is known also as the Wenmiao Temple in Chinese, and is situated in the southeast of Wuwei City. This ancient complex dates from the Ming Dynasty having been established in 1439 on instructions from the reigning emperor and with the strong backing of public subscription. The construction of the original temple took just two years but various extensions have been added over succeeding centuries.

The well-preserved and symmetrically aligned historic buildings together with the collection of stone steles and fine collection of scriptures means that Confucian Temple occupies a very important position in the cultural heritage of the Chinese nation as a whole.
In 1981 the Gansu Provincial Government declared that the Confucian Temple as a Provincial Relic Protected Unit and at the same time the Wuwei Museum was established on the site. The Museum has a magnificent collection of artifacts that include in excess of 36,000 books, scriptures, calligraphies, paintings and other cultural relics. Notable items are Wooden and Bamboo Slips of the Han Dynasty, Wooden Scriptures, a Mummy, the Galloping Bronze Horse and a Bronze Cannon of the Western Xia (1038-1227AD) Dynasty.

September 1, 2009

 

Leitai Han  Tomb is located inside the Leitai Park in Beiguan Rd. , Wuwei City.  It is a large tomb built with brick and stone in the late years (186-219) of the Eastern Han Dynasty, from which the Bronze Galloping Horse, the logo of China’s tourism was unearthed. On Leitai (literally the Platform of Thor) standing the Shrine of  Thor’s ancestor in a temple for sacrificing the Thor in the past, hence the name. There are 231 cultural relics and 99 bronze chariots with honored guards of tomb figure unearthed from this tomb.  The greenish Bronze Galloping Horse, also named  the “horse with hoof on a swallow”, has a height of 34.5cm, length of 45cm and weight of 7.15kg.  The wonder is that the galloping modeling of horse surpassed the flying swallow with three hoofs as well as its head and tail raised in the air, it steel keeps well balanced, completely complying with the equilibrium theory of mechanics, reflecting the rich cultural contents of the “Heaven Horse”.  It was cast with such excellent skill and can be reputed as the masterwork of the Bronze Art. Leitai Park has been turned into a hot scenic zone featuring the “Heaven Horse Culture” today.

September 1, 2009

Wuwei is located in northwest central Gansu province. In the north it borders Inner Mongolia, in the southwest, Qinghai. Its central location between three western capitals, Lanzhou, Xining, and Yinchuan makes it an important business and transportation hub for the area. Because of its position along the Hexi Corridor, historically the only route from central China to western China and the rest of Central Asia, many major railroads and national highways pass through Wuwei.

In ancient times, Wuwei was called Liangzhou  and is the eastern terminus of the Hexi Corridor. People began settling here 5000 years ago. It was a key link for the Northern Silk Road, and a number of important archaeological finds were uncovered from Wuwei, including ancient copper carts with stone animals. In 121 BC Han emperor Wudi brought his cavalry here to defend the Hexi Corridor against the Xiongnu. His military success allowed him to expand the corridor westward. Its importance as a stop along the Silk Road made it a crossroads of cultures and ethnic groups from all over central Asia. Numerous Buddhist grottoes and temples in the area attest to its role as a path for bringing Buddhism from India and Afghanistan to China.
Famous cultural relics from Wuwei include the Galloping Bronze Horse , Western Xia stele , White Tower Temple , Tianti Mountain Grotto, Luoshi Temple Tower, and the Wen Shrine .